Scott Schebler, Dodgers' Minor League POY, by Dustin Nosler Scott Schebler, Dodgers' Minor League POY, by Dustin Nosler

2014 Top 50 Dodgers’ prospects: No. 11-20

Scott Schebler, Dodgers' Minor League POY, by Dustin Nosler

Scott Schebler, Dodgers’ Minor League POY, by Dustin Nosler

This is the fourth of a 5-part series detailing my Top 50 Dodgers’ prospects. These are scouting reports for Nos. 11-20.

Previous entries
Prospect landing page

No. 21-30
No. 31-40
No. 41-50

Editor’s note: I am not a scout (#notascout). This is an amateur scouting report based on what I know about baseball and from following the sport all my life. I don’t claim to be a pro, I just want to pass along the information to the masses. All ratings in the charts below are on the standard 20-80 scouting scale, where 50 is roughly average, 80 is elite and nearly unattainable (think an Aroldis Chapman fastball), and 20 is unacceptably poor. Enjoy.

11. Tom Windle, LHP (6’4, 215, 22 years old)
I wasn’t a fan of the Dodgers taking Windle in the second round of the 2013 draft, but it looks like he could end up being solid. He signed for slot and his Chris Reed-esque profile is probably what doesn’t do it for me. Windle is a big guy who can run it up to 94 MPH, but sits in the 88-92 MPH range. He gets a little movement on it, but it isn’t a traditional sinker by any means. His best off-speed pitch is his low-80s slider that flashes plus-potential. It’s a true swing-and-miss pitch when he is consistent with the pitch. He also has a fringy changeup that could use some work — and will need it if he’s to remain in the rotation. But a consistent third pitch might be the biggest obstacle for Windle’s long-term starting aspirations.

Tools Now Future
Fastball 45 55
Slider 50 60
Changeup 40 45
Cmd/Ctrl 40 50
Delivery 40 45

Windle’s delivery is high-effort and not generally conducive to starting long-term. It isn’t an easily repeatable, which leads to his below-average command that has a future grade of average. Average command/control is OK for a starter, but if he can’t throw strikes consistently, he could be a bullpen arm. His arm action isn’t smooth and it takes a lot for him to deliver pitches from a three-quarters arm slot. More effort means more energy expended, which means less stamina, which means a long-term relief pitcher. If Windle remains in the rotation, he could be a No. 3 or 4 starter. If not, he should be a power lefty out of the bullpen with strikeout-per-inning stuff. He fared well at Great Lakes in his debut, and should begin the season in Rancho Cucamonga. He could see a midseason promotion to Chattanooga if he performs well.

2013 ranking: NR
2014 location: High-A Rancho Cucamonga/Double-A Chattanooga
ETA: late-2015

Tools Now Future
Fastball 70 75
Slider 45 55
Changeup 45 55
Cmd/Ctrl 40 50
Delivery 45 55

12. Jose Dominguez, RHP (6’0, 160, 23 years old)
Dominguez made his Major League debut in 2013, and it was somewhat surprising. It was also cut short by a quadriceps injury he suffered in Toronto in July. He’s gone from low-level guy who struggled to throw strikes to a potential late-inning reliever with elite fastball velocity. Dominguez was signed at age-16 out of the Dominican Republic for $50,000. He was a starting pitcher in his first four professional seasons, but has fared much better out of the bullpen. He has the best fastball in the system. It routinely sits in the mid-90s and touches the upper-90s with some regularity. He’s even hit triple digits on occasion. He backs it up with a low-to-mid-80s slider that flashes plus-potential at times. He also has a surprisingly solid mid-80s changeup that should be a weapon against left-handers.

Dominguez’s main issue is he has inconsistent command and control. He walked 4.3 hitters per nine innings in the minors. He actually has a solid, repeatable delivery. His arm can drag at times, causing his mechanics to get out of sync. With proper coaching, he could have average command and control, which would help him reach his ceiling as an eighth- or ninth-inning reliever. With the Dodgers’ bullpen logjam, he’ll head back to Albuquerque and should be one of the first relievers recalled when the need arises.

2013 ranking: 23
2014 location: Triple-A Albuquerque/Majors
ETA: Now

Tools Now Future
Hitting 45 50
Power 45 55
Speed 50 50
Fielding 50 50
Arm 55 55

13. Scott Schebler, RF/LF (6’1, 215, 23 years old)
Schebler won the Dodgers’ Minor League Player of the Year award with a great season in Rancho Cucamonga. A 26th-round selection in the 2010 MLB Draft, Schebler was a late signing, but it appears the Dodgers go their money’s worth (he signed for $300,000). Schebler has a thick frame and uses his strong hands to generate above-average bat speed. When he drops the back shoulder, his swing can get a little long. When things are going right, he has a short, quick stroke. He gets pull-happy at times, as that’s where most of his power is. I saw him his three home runs in person this season — only one was a cheapy. The most impressive was a moonshot to straight-away center field in Stockton. He hits well against lefties, as he hit for a better average and just a little less power than he did against righties. He doesn’t have a plus-hit tool and doesn’t walk a whole lot, but he’s improved his walk rate every season he’s been a professional.

On defense, he profiles as a corner outfielder. He has enough arm for right field, where his arm would be average. It fits better in left field, but he has enough range to handle either corner with relative ease. He can swipe a few bases, but he won’t be mistaken for James Baldwin. One criticism of Schebler is he can let his emotions get the best of him. If he isn’t going well, he lets everyone know. That causes him to lose concentration and go into prolonged slumps. It’s reminiscent of Andre Ethier, I suppose. But he seemed to do much better with that in 2013. He’ll face a make-or-break season in Chattanooga, where his true skill will (or won’t) show up.

2013 ranking: 37
2014 location: Double-A Chattanooga
ETA: 2016

Tools Now Future
Hitting 40 50
Power 30 50
Speed 40 45
Fielding 50 50
Arm 50 55

14. Alex Santana, 3B/OF (6’4, 200, 20 years old)
Santana was the Dodgers’ second-round pick in the 2011 draft, and while it’s been a slow development process, but he showed signs of his potential in 2013. Playing in the hitter-friendly Pioneer League, Santana hit .327 with a .391 on-base percentage. He has a big frame that isn’t yet fully matured. He’s a line drive hitter as of now, as he drives the ball to the gaps. He has a quick bat, but his swing can get long at times. Taller hitters run into this problem. While he projects to have average power, he hasn’t yet shown it in his professional career (five home runs in 645 plate appearances). But, power is typically the last thing to develop in hitters. He improved his walk rate dramatically in 2013, which is promising.

While Santana was a shortstop in high school, he was immediately moved to third base by the Dodgers. He has soft hands and a strong arm, but the Dodgers were compelled to try him in the outfield in the instructional league. It’s unsure if a move to the outfield is permanent, but it at least gives Santana some flexibility (even if third base is a black hole in the Dodgers’ farm system). Either way, his arm is strong enough for third base or a corner outfield spot. He isn’t a base-clogger, but he also won’t be a stole-base threat in the bigs (or the minors). Santana should get his first look at full-season ball in the Midwest League.

2013 ranking: 28
2014 location: Low-A Great Lakes
ETA: late-2017

Tools Now Future
Hitting 40 50
Power 40 50
Speed 45 50
Fielding 45 55
Arm 45 55

15. Jacob Scavuzzo, OF (6’4, 195, 20 years old)
Scavuzzo is one of the most athletic players in the Dodgers’ system. As a 21st-round pick in 2012, he could end up being one of Logan White’s hidden gems. After a lackluster debut, he took major steps forward in 2013. Despite it being the Pioneer League, Scavuzzo showed his skill as a 19-year-old in rookie ball. While he doesn’t project to be a plus-plus hitter at the next level, he could have an average or better hit tool, especially if he learns to take a walk every so often. He showed an ability to hit for power, as he led the Pioneer League in homers. He’s extremely raw at the plate and has a lot of room left for projection.

While he has the athleticism to play center field (and he might unless there’s someone better ahead of him at his level), he fits better in a corner — most likely left field. He has speed, but he isn’t a base-stealer (10-for-17 in his career). Some wonder if he’ll be able to hit advanced pitching, which he should have a chance to prove in 2014 at Great Lakes. He’s a guy to watch this season to see if he continues to improve or if he’s just another guy.

2013 ranking: NR
2014 location: Low-A Great Lakes
ETA: 2017

Tools Now Future
Fastball 50 50
Slider 50 50
Cmd/Ctrl 45 50
Delivery 45 50

16. Yimi Garcia, RHP (6’1, 175, 23 years old)
Garcia has been one of the more underrated Dodger prospects for the last few years. He doesn’t have the plus-fastball of a Dominguez, but he works well with what he has. His fastball is only a low-90s offering, but as Chad Moriyama pointed out in December, the spin of his fastball leads to hitters being fooled, giving it a “sneaky” feeling. He also locates it well. He pairs his “sneaky” fastball with a slider that flashes plus-potential at times. Both pitches can be inconsistent (especially his slider), but he didn’t accumulate a 11.2 strikeouts per nine innings rate on accident. The kid knows how to pitch, and does so with a delivery that isn’t as clean as most in the system, but it’s effective. He has a little bit of arm whip action, which is something to keep an eye on. He also has a little funk that he uses to deceive hitters. He’s a seventh- or eighth-inning reliever, as opposed to a closer-type. He should head to Albuquerque and be on the short list to make his Major League debut in 2014.

2013 ranking: 19
2014 location: Triple-A Albuquerque/Majors
ETA: mid-2014

Tools Now Future
Hitting 35 50
Power 30 50
Speed 40 45
Fielding 50 70
Arm 45 55

17. Cody Bellinger, 1B (6’4, 180, 18 years old)
As the only high schooler the Dodgers drafted in the first 10 rounds of the 2013 draft, Bellinger was one of my favorite selections. He didn’t perform particularly well in the Arizona League, but there’s all kinds of projection left in this 18-year-old. He draws comparisons to Adam LaRoche with a plus-glove. The lanky Bellinger has a straight up-and-down stance that’s quiet at the plate. He holds his hands high and drops them down when he loads. His stride is long, but surprisingly balanced for such a young hitter. He’s able to generate solid-average bat speed that should improve as he matures physically. He has a smooth left-handed stroke that works best when he’s going to left-center field. He could be an average hitter with above-average power, if he fills out and reaches his offensive ceiling.

Bellinger is already Major League average defensively at first base and projects to be at least a plus-defender, ala James Loney. The Dodgers aren’t overly aggressive with their position prospects, so Bellinger will likely head to Ogden for his second professional season. He should be ready at about the time Adrian Gonzalez‘s contract runs out.

2013 ranking: NR
2014 location: Pioneer League
ETA: 2019

Tools Now Future
Fastball 45 45
Curveball 50 50
Changeup 45 45
Cmd/Ctrl 55 60
Delivery 50 55

18. Duke von Schamann, RHP (6’4, 220, 23 years old)
An easy 80 name to go along with Pratt Maynard, von Schamann is one of the better “pitchers” in the Dodgers’ system. Drafted as a college senior, he’s more mature than most coming out of college, and it shows on the mound. He doesn’t have plus-stuff, but he knows what to do with his pitches. His 88-90 MPH fastball has some sink to it. When he’s going well, he locates it where he wants. He also has a curveball that is a little loopy, but also has an 11-5 break. His changeup is fringy and in the upper-70s-to-low-80s.

His delivery is clean and he repeats it well. He has some of the best control and command in the system. He’s not afraid to throw any pitch in any count because of his plus-control. As a big guy, one would expect more velocity. But he’s a smart pitcher who profiles as a back-of-the-rotation starter or a long-reliever. He should go back to Chattanooga in 2014.

2013 ranking: 31
2014 location: Double-A Chattanooga
ETA: late-2015

Tools Now Future
Fastball 45 55
Curveball 25 40
Changeup 45 50
Cmd/Ctrl 45 50
Delivery 45 50

19. Victor Gonzalez, LHP (6’0, 200, 18 years old)
Gonzalez is basically a slightly older, slightly less talented Julio Urias. Both of them were signed out of Mexico, and Gonzalez showed a nice feel for pitching in his debut season. He was signed on the first day of the 2012 international signing period. As a 17-year-old in the Arizona League, he was able to post a 3.79 ERA and struck out more than a batter per inning (45 in 38 innings). His stuff isn’t on Urias’ level, but it could grade out as average across the board in the future. His fastball is an 88-90 MPH offering that could tick up as he matures. It’s already touching the low-90s. His best breaking pitch isn’t much, as his changeup is his best secondary offering. It’s a low-80s pitch that flashes plus-potential at times. He should see the Pioneer League, but I’d like to see the Dodgers be aggressive and send him to the Midwest League.

2013 ranking: NR
2014 location: Pioneer League/Low-A Great Lakes
ETA: 2018

Tools Now Future
Fastball 40 55
Curveball 45 55
Slider 35 45
Changeup 40 50
Cmd/Ctrl 35 45
Delivery 45 50

20. Zachary Bird, RHP (6’4, 205, 19 years old)
The Dodgers nabbed Bird in the ninth round of the 2012 draft. He looked like a steal, signing for just $13,900 over the slot recommended amount. He showed real promise in his debut season, but regressed a bit in 2013. He still offers a lot of projection and upside in his young, slender frame. Bird sports a low-90s fastball that has already touched the mid-90s. It could be a plus-pitch if he can locate it. His main off-speed pitch is his mid-70s curveball. It flashes plus-potential, but that’s more infrequent than his fastball. He also has a changeup that he’s working to make his No. 3 pitch and a fringy slider that he might have to ditch in favor of the other two off-speed pitches.

Bird is a tall pitcher who throws from a true over-the-top arm slot. Because of that, he has trouble repeating his delivery, leading to below-average control and command of all his pitches. Despite his troubles, he still has a No. 3 ceiling and a back-of-the-rotation floor, but it will all depend on his ability to go from thrower to pitcher. He could get bumped to Rancho Cucamonga to face advanced hitters, something that would be a challenge for him.

2013 ranking: 14
2014 location: High-A Rancho Cucamonga
ETA: 2017


About

Dustin Nosler began writing about the Dodgers in July 2009 at his blog, Feelin’ Kinda Blue. He co-hosts a weekly podcast with Jared Massey called “Dugout Blues.” He graduated from California State University, Sacramento, with his bachelor’s degree in journalism and a minor in digital media. While at CSUS, he worked for the student-run newspaper The State Hornet for three years, culminating with a 1-year term as editor-in-chief. He resides in Stockton, Calif., and has yet to be shot.


558 comments
Lobo
Lobo

The final Breaking Madden of the season was wonderful

efb
efb

in celebration of this news here's 2014 Top 50 Dodgers’ prospects: No. 1-10!

efb
efb

@Purple Drank that would be really sad if Roger Dodger is like a 12 year old or something and then a nationally recognized sports writer makes fun of him. 

TellMyWifeISaidHello
TellMyWifeISaidHello

@Purple Drank  I like that in his new article it says "when they have about 10 people over there who post what seems to be hundreds of times." It way closer to thousands of times.

DBrim
DBrim moderator

Our long, national nightmare is over.

DINGERS!
DINGERS!

H/T Eeph Blue because he had better taste in cats than I do

DBrim
DBrim moderator

No, it doesn't.

Purple Drank
Purple Drank

@DBrim Now Don will have to find alternative methods for justifying pinch running Dee for AGone

Batted Bob
Batted Bob

@Purple Drank @efb 12 year olds know better than to look at win loss records. Only old people think that stat is real.