2015 Dodgers Top 100 Prospects: No. 100-76

Here is the first set of rankings in my Top 100 prospect series. There are some names people will recognize, but on the whole, there’s a ton of players many do not know.

Previous entries in the series:

If I had to choose a player I’m most excited about on this portion of the list, I’d go with No. 87. He has raw talent and a big arm and is really young.

Editor’s note: I am not a scout (#notascout). I am an amateur when it comes to evaluating players. I don’t claim to be a pro, I just want to pass along the information to the masses. Notes and comments are based on personal observation, talking to sources, reading scouting reports and watching video. For future entries in this series: All ratings in the charts below are on the standard 20-80 scouting scale, where 50 is roughly average, 80 is elite and nearly unattainable (think Giancarlo Stanton‘s power), and 20 is unacceptably poor. Enjoy.

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100. 1B/LF Ibandel Isabel (6’4, 185 pounds, 20 years old)
An unknown going into 2013, Isabel had a solid showing in the Dominican. He got to the AZL last year and struggled, surprisingly. He was already old for the level and couldn’t figure out the pitching. He profiles better in the outfield than first base. His frame lends itself to power potential, but he hasn’t shown a ton of it so far. His swing isn’t smooth and needs a lot of work.
Best tool: Hit
2015 location: Rookie Ogden
ETA: 2020

99. OF Romer Cuadrado (6’4, 195 pounds, 17 years old)
Dodgers’ most expensive international signing in 2014 ($750,000), a toolsy outfielder with raw, projectable power. He’s a corner outfielder and will make his professional debut in 2015.
Best tool: Power
2015 location: DSL Dodgers
ETA: 2022

98. RHP Hector Rodriguez (6’3, 190 pounds, 20 years old)
Rodriguez was an international signing out of Venezuela in 2013, and he finished his second stint with the DSL Dodgers. He displayed improved command with his pitches and was the team’s ace. Needs to get out of complex ball soon to have a shot.
Best tool: Control/Command
2015 location: AZL Dodgers/Rookie Ogden
ETA: 2021

97. RHP Trevor Oaks (6’3, 220 pounds, 22 years old)
Dodgers’ 7th-round draft pick in 2014, debuted at Ogden and showed an ability to keep the ball in the park. Uses a high-80s sinker, a slider, curveball and changeup.
Best tool: Sinker
2015 location: Rookie Ogden/Low-A Great Lakes
ETA: 2019

96. 2B/SS Samuel Ortiz (5’11, 170 pounds 18 years old)
International signing out of the Dominican Republic, Ortiz walked more than he struck out in his second pro season while playing mostly second base. Might be able to play shortstop in a pinch.
Best tool: Hit (plate discipline)
2015 location: AZL Dodgers
ETA: 2020

95. LHP Max Gooding (5’11, 165 pounds, 19 years old)
International signing out of Panama in 2013, Gooding pitched exclusively out of the bullpen for the Dominican Summer League Dodgers. Doesn’t have overpowering stuff and a slight frame could prevent him from ever being a starter.
Best tool: Fastball
2015 location: AZL Dodgers
ETA: 2020

94. OF Matt Jones (6’7, 250 pounds, 21 years old)
Dodgers’ 25th-round pick in 2014, Jones is a big-bodied player with untapped power potential. Struggled in Arizona Rookie League and is strictly a corner outfielder.
Best tool: Power
2015 location: Rookie Ogden/Low-A Great Lakes
ETA: 2019

93. RHP Harlan Richter (6’6, 225 pounds, 22 years old)
A reliever, Richter was the Dodgers’ 27th-round draft pick in 2014 and was wild in his debut season in the Arizona Rookie League. Has a fastball that sits in the 88-90 MPH range.
Best tool: Fastball
2015 location: Rookie Ogden/Low-A Great Lakes
ETA: 2019

92. RHP Carson Baranik (6’3, 205 pounds, 22 years old)
Was decent in his debut as a 2014 33rd-rounder, Baranik has an 89-91 fastball that touches the mid-90s at times and three secondary pitches: slider, curveball and changeup. He’ll need to scrap at least one of those, if he hasn’t already.
Best tool: Curveball
2015 location: Rookie Ogden/Low-A Great Lakes
ETA: 2018

91. RHP Matt Shelton (6’4, 205 pounds, 26 years old)
Former 24th-round pick in 2011, Shelton has split time between starting and relieving. He missed more bats as a reliever, but made 16 starts in 2014. He added a knuckleball to his repertoire, one of the few in the system.
Best tool: Fastball
2015 location: Triple-A Oklahoma City/Double-A Tulsa
ETA: 2016

90. CF James Baldwin (6’3, 205 pounds, 23 years old)
Perhaps the best athlete and toolsiest player in the system, Baldwin has never put it all together. He has such raw athleticism and ability that it’s hard not to be high on him, but he has poor bat speed, doesn’t make enough contact and swings for the fences. Checked in at No. 45 last year.
Best tool: Defense
2015 location: Double-A Tulsa
ETA: 2018

89. C Hendrik Clementina (6’0, 165 pounds, 18 years old)
Signed out of Curaco on Jan. 7, 2014, Clementina got off to a hot start in his debut season before posting pedestrian numbers. Still, he showed some flashes and is really young. Needs to make it stateside in 2015.
Best tool: Hit
2015 location: AZL Dodgers
ETA: 2021

88. RHP Brock Stewart (6’3, 170 pounds, 23 years old)
Drafted as a reliever in the 6th round of the 2014 draft after playing mostly infield in college, Stewart was able to tally 11.8 strikeouts per nine innings in Ogden and even made a spot-start. His arm strength is good, but he needs to develop his secondary pitches.
Best tool: Fastball
2015 location: Low-A Great Lakes
ETA: 2018

87. RHP Dennis Santana (6’2, 160 pounds, 19 years old)
Originally signed as a shortstop, the Dodgers converted him to the mound, and it’s looking like the right decision. Struck out 38 in 34 1/3 innings in his mound debut after hitting just .198/.312/.298 in 2013.
Best tool: Fastball
2015 location: AZL Dodgers
ETA: 2020

86. 3B Michael Ahmed (6’2, 195 pounds, 23 years old)
Brother of Nick Ahmed, Michael was the Dodgers’ 20th-round pick in 2013 and hits more like a middle infielder than a third baseman. He has zero home runs in 387 professional plate appearances, which doesn’t bode well for his future at third base.
Best tool: Defense
2015 location: Low-A Great Lakes
ETA: 2019

85. RHP Kevin Guzman (6’3, 165 pounds, 20 years old)
Guzman was signed out of Venezuela in May 2013, and has pitched a decent amount in his first two seasons. But, he hasn’t advanced beyond complex ball, but he’s shown an ability to minimize walks while keeping the ball in the yard. Could be a deep sleeper.
Best tool: Fastball
2015 location: Rookie Ogden
ETA: 2019

84. 1B/OF Aaron Miller (6’3, 200 pounds, 27 years old)
Converted pitcher and former supplemental 1st-round pick (2009), Miller has taken to hitting better than expected. Still, he’s older and has yet to crack the Double-A lineup. Has decent plate discipline and power potential, but likely a career minor-leaguer.
Best tool: Power
2015 location: Double-A Tulsa
ETA: 2017

83. OF Jon Garcia (5’11, 175 pounds, 23 years old)
For a smaller guy, he has a lot of power potential. But, he has next to zero plate discipline and hasn’t shown the ability to make adjustments. Also has a prototypical arm for right field.
Best tool: Arm
2015 location: Double-A Tulsa
ETA: 2018

82. RHP J.D. Underwood (6’2, 215 pounds, 22 years old)
A 5th-round pick in 2013, Underwood hasn’t exactly gotten on track in his career. Spent all of 2014 with Ogden and struggled a lot. He ranked No. 48 last in my Top 50. He has a fringy fastball, a slider and curveball — neither of which are plus-offerings. His curveball is a little better than the slider.
Best tool: Curveball
2015 location: Low-A Great Lakes
ETA: 2019

81. OF Theo Alexander (6’1, 195 pounds, 20 years old)
Alexander was a prep draftee in 2012 and was popped on the strength of his power potential and athleticism. He hasn’t quite lived up to the potential yet, but he’s still young. He’s athletic enough for center field, but has played predominantly in the corners since turning pro.
Best tool: Power
2015 location: Low-A Great Lakes/Rookie Ogden
ETA: 2020

80. 2B/3B Carlos Aquino (6’0, 165 pounds, 19 years old)
Aquino was signed out of the Dominican in January 2013 for $75,000. He showed decent on-base skills for the DSL Dodgers at age 18, which is a touch old for the level. He split time between second and third base, but his lack of power should keep him at second. His swing was long when he signed, and it has seemingly improved. He’s a line drive hitter with average speed and has a decent glove at second base.
Best tool: Defense
2015 location: AZL Dodgers
ETA: 2020

79. RHP Osiris Ramirez (6’3, 185 pounds, 19 years old)
The name is great, and the numbers he put up in his second season were good-not-great. Ramirez has some projection left him him, but he doesn’t miss a ton of bats. Rather, he focuses on keeping the ball down and in the yard. Should make the jump stateside this year.
Best tool: Fastball
2015 location: AZL Dodgers
ETA: 2020

78. RHP Lenix Osuna (6’1, 220 pounds, 19 years old)
The son of former Dodger Antonio Osuna, Lenix signed in 2012 in the group out of Mexico that produced Julian Leon, Cristian Gomez, Victor Gonzalez and William Soto (about $1 million total for all of them). He’s strictly a reliever with decent swing-and-miss stuff, including a mid-90s fastball. Could rise in the rankings with a good showing in 2015.
Best tool: Fastball
2015 location: Rookie Ogden/Low-A Great Lakes
ETA: 2019

77. SS Moises Perez (5’10, 150 pounds, 17 years old)
A true shortstop, Perez was signed out of Venezuela in July 2013 for $250,000 and made his professional debut in 2014. He, predictably, didn’t hit well, but he was able to handle shortstop in his first exposure to the pro game. He’s a good athlete with a strong arm, but his approach at the plate needs some work. He’ll never hit for much power. His profile reminds me a bit of fellow countryman Cesar Izturis.
Best tool: Arm
2015 location: DSL Dodgers/AZL Dodgers
ETA: 2022

76. 1B/C Tyler Ogle (5’10, 210 pounds, 24 years old)
Ogle’s catching days are all but over, and he doesn’t provide much power at first base. But he has a good eye, as he draws a lot of walks. He’s a poor defender with a poor arm, no matter where he plays.
Best tool: Hit (plate discipline)
2015 location: Double-A Tulsa
ETA: 2017

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Next up: Prospects 75-51

About Dustin Nosler

Dustin Nosler
Dustin Nosler began writing about the Dodgers in July 2009 at his blog, Feelin' Kinda Blue. He co-hosts a weekly podcast with Jared Massey called Dugout Blues. He does contracts and depth charts for FanGraphs and is a contributor/editor at The Hardball Times. He graduated from California State University, Sacramento, with his bachelor’s degree in journalism and a minor in digital media. While at CSUS, he worked for the student-run newspaper The State Hornet for three years, culminating with a one-year term as editor-in-chief. He resides in Stockton, California, and has yet to be shot.