2018 Dodgers Top 100 Prospects: No. 75-51

Adam Bray (Photo: Dustin Nosler)

The names are getting increasingly more familiar — and they will as the list keeps progressing. There are some recent draftees, international signings and minor-league signings included here. There are also quite a few sleepers in this portion of the list, all the way from 51 up to 75. It’ll be interesting to watch some of these guys progress this season.

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Previous entries in the series:

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Editor’s Note: I am not a scout (#notascout). I am an amateur when it comes to evaluating players. I don’t claim to be a pro, I just want to pass along the information I observe/obtain to the people. Notes and comments are based on personal observation, talking to sources, reading scouting reports and watching video. For future entries in this series: All ratings in the charts below are on the standard 20-80 scouting scale, where 50 is roughly average, 80 is elite, and 20 is unacceptably poor. Enjoy.

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75. RHP Oscar Arzaga (6’6, 236 pounds, 18 years old)

When the Dodgers signed Arzaga, there wasn’t much fanfare behind it. He was in a unique situation in that he went to high school but chose to sign as an international free agent on Feb. 4, 2016, for $300,000. He had a decent debut season in the AZL, posting a 4.00 ERA in 36 innings. But Arzaga didn’t pitch in 2017 due to an oblique injury. When he last pitched, he was a guy who worked in the 89-92 MPH range with a low-80s slider — not that dissimilar from the reports when he signed. Perhaps he was hurt, perhaps he was improving his strength and conditioning. He was No. 43 on this list last year.

Best tool: Fastball
2018 location: AZL Dodgers
ETA: 2023

74. 1B Luis Paz (6’0, 220 pounds, 21 years old)

One of the few prospects from Brazil in the system, Paz signed as an international free agent in May 2013. He spent three uneventful seasons in the DSL before going to Ogden in 2016. He hit well enough there to get a look at A-ball ball with the Loons. He struggled in his first taste of full-season ball (.196/.248/.301) and was sent back to Ogden where he hit quite well (1.010 OPS). He dabbled in the outfield and even a bit behind the plate. If he could handle the rigors of catching, he’d be a far more interesting prospect. Instead, he’ll have to prove he can hit outside the Pioneer League to stay on most folks’ radars.

Best tool: Power
2018 location: Low-A Great Lakes/High-A Rancho Cucamonga
ETA: 2022

73. RHP Elio Serrano (5’11, 160 pounds, 19 years old)

Serrano was signed in July 2015 out of Venezuela. After two years in the DSL, he’s ready for a stateside assignment. In the DSL, Serrano posted a 2.25 ERA, 27.3 K%, 8.8 BB% and didn’t allow a home run in 56 innings over two seasons. He’s also given up just eight extra base hits in those innings.

Best tool: Fastball
2018 location: AZL Dodgers
ETA: 2024

72. RHP Miguel Urena (6’6, 249 pounds, 23 years old)

Urena was signed out of the Dominican Republic in January 2013. He’s been on this list a lot, including No. 93 last year. He’s a large human, but he doesn’t have the big-time fastball (high-80s/low-90s) one would expect from a man of his carriage. He has been praised for his clean delivery in the past. He was moved to the bullpen full-time last season and had some success in Ogden before also having success in Great Lakes. If he can add a little velo with the pivot to the ‘pen, that could increase his stock.

Best tool: Delivery
2018 location: High-A Rancho Cucamonga
ETA: 2021

71. RHP Nolan Long (6’9, 259 pounds, 24 years old)

The tallest Dodger in the org, Long was a 16th-round pick in the 2015 MLB Draft. Like Urena, he moved to the bullpen full-time in 2017 and had really good results with Great Lakes. He was a bit wild (11.4 BB%), but he also struck out his fare share of hitters (32 percent). He works with a low-90s fastball, a curveball and a changeup. He was No. 62 on the list last year.

Best tool: Fastball
2018 location: High-A Rancho Cucamonga/Double-A Tulsa
ETA: 2021

70. RHP Kevin Malisheski (6’3, 199 pounds, 20 years old)

Malisheski, No. 94 on this list last year, was the Dodgers’ 38th-round draft pick out of Waucondo High School in Illinois. He signed for $251,000 — $151,000 over slot, partially because he was recovering from a torn ACL. In his first two seasons (both in the Arizona Rookie League), he has a 3.83 ERA, 19.7 K%, 6.4 BB% and has allowed four home runs in 51 2/3 innings. He pitches in the 88-91 MPH range as of now, but has been as high as 93 MPH. As he gets more work, there’s a chance his velocity could become more consistently above-average.

Best tool: Fastball
2018 location: Rookie Ogden/Low-A Great Lakes
ETA: 2023

69. RHP Jose Chacin (6’4, 173 pounds, 21 years old)

Chacin was No. 100 on this list last season. The Dodgers signed him out of Venezuela in September 2015. In his first exposure stateside, Chacin handled himself well in the AZL: 4.04 ERA, 24.1 K% and an impressive 3.5 BB%. He got touched up for five home runs, but in his first 100-plus innings of professional work, Chacin is holding his own. He might ultimately be a reliever, but he should still draw some starts for now.

Best tool: Command/Control
2018 location: Rookie Ogden
ETA: 2023

68. OF Mitchell Hansen (6’3, 197 pounds, 22 years old)

The Dodgers’ 2nd-round pick in 2015 hasn’t really put it all together. He signed for nearly a million bucks, but the return on the Dodgers’ investment hasn’t been great so far. Hansen, No. 29 last year, began 2017 with the Loons and struggled mightily: .198/.288/.312. That earned him a demotion to Ogden where, unsurprisingly, he hit well: .329/.392/.614. He’ll need to show he can hit outside rookie ball to regain any kind of prospect notoriety.

Best tool: Hit
2018 location: Low-A Great Lakes/High-A Rancho Cucamonga
ETA: 2022

67. RHP Alfredo Tavarez (6’4, 247 pounds, 20 years old)

Tavarez signed with the Dodgers out of the Dominican Republic in December 2015. He was invited to instructs after a solid 2017 season in the Arizona Rookie and Midwest Leagues. In Arizona, he had a 40.2 strikeout percentage and an 8.5 percent walk rate. That earned him an August promotion to Great Lakes. While he gave up some runs, he still was somewhat effective. Despite the large frame, he only sits in the high-80s and touches 90-plus on occasion. What has gotten him through the lower levels so far is plus breaking ball. It’s more of a slider than a curveball, but it has slurve-like tendencies. As he goes up the minor-league ladder, he’ll have to be pinpoint with his command (which isn’t great at present) or add some velocity.

Best tool: Breaking ball
2018 location: Low-A Great Lakes/High-A Rancho Cucamonga
ETA: 2022

66. RHP Logan Crouse (6’4, 234 pounds, 21 years old)

The Dodgers drafted the big-bodied Crouse in the 30th-round of the 2015 draft. They gave him a $500,000 signing bonus after failing to come to terms with supplemental 1st-rounder Kyle Funkhouser. He ranked 49th on this list last year. He logged only 10 1/3 innings in 2017, but did get his first taste of full-season ball with the Loons. He doesn’t throw as hard as his frame would lead you to believe (88-92 MPH) and pairs it with a slider. His changeup is below-average at present and might move to the bullpen. He’ll need to log some innings this season to see how much of a prospect he actually is.

Best tool: Fastball
2018 location: Low-A Great Lakes
ETA: 2022

65. SS Jacob Amaya (6’0, 181 pounds, 19 years old)

Amaya was popped in the 11th round of the 2017 draft. A local kid, he signed for $247,000 and went straight to the AZL. While he doesn’t have much power, he managed to hit .254/.364/.356 in 140 plate appearances. His calling card early in his career is his defense, and he has a legitimate chance to stick at shortstop. If not, he could be a utility infielder-type, but the Dodgers are hoping for more than that.

Best tool: Defense
2018 location: AZL Dodgers/Rookie Ogden
ETA: 2023

64. OF Shakir Albert (5’11, 220 pounds, 21 years old)

Signed out of Curacao in December 2013, Albert has been trending the opposite direction in terms of plate appearances. He had 250 in his age-17 season in the DSL and it has gone down exponentially every season. He logged just 76 plate appearances in 2017, but the scouting profile bests the production on the field. He has a lot of raw power — mostly to the pull side — but his hit tool is lagging a bit behind. He has a nice swing, so there’s still hope he can figure it out. Defensively, he’s strictly a corner guy. The most important thing for him in 2018: Stay on the field.

Best tool: Power
2018 location: Rookie Ogden/Low-A Great Lakes
ETA: 2022

63. LHP Leonardo Crawford (5’10, 196 pounds, 21 years old)

Crawford was signed for $47,500 out of Nicaragua when he was 17 years old. He dominated the DSL in 2015 and quickly found himself stateside. He’s spent most of the last two seasons with the Loons, with the 2017 season being a step in the wrong direction. His stuff hasn’t progressed, as he throws in the high-80s and touches 90 every so often. His mid-70s changeup is his bread and butter, but his high-70s breaking ball still needs some work. A move to the bullpen might be in order soon for the southpaw.

Best tool: Changeup
2018 location: High-A Rancho Cucamonga
ETA: 2022

62. 3B/1B Sauryn Lao (6’2, 190 pounds, 18 years old)

Lao signed as a 16-year-old in October 2015 out of the Dominican Republic. After a so-so debut (at age-16), his 2017 season showed a lot of promise. He hit well and showed a little more power. More importantly, he showed he can get on base and even swipe a bag here or there. It’s the DSL, so take the numbers with a grain of salt, but the Dodgers invited him to the instructional league, so they think there’s something there with this kid. There’s untapped power potential in his frame once he matures physically.

Best tool: Hit
2018 location: AZL Dodgers/Rookie Ogden
ETA: 2023

61. RHP Corey Copping (6’1, 195 pounds, 24 years old)

Copping was the Dodgers’ 31st-rounder in 2015 out of the University of Oklahoma. His career trajectory has been normal, but what isn’t normal is his strikeout rates. They’ve declined in each of his three seasons, bottoming out at 20.9 percent this season with Tulsa. This is after he was a Driveline Baseball participant to help increase his velocity. It worked temporarily — he sat in the 92-94 MPH range — but he was back down in the 90-92 MPH range last season. Without a plus breaking ball, he might have reached his peak as a prospect. He was No. 60 last year.

Best tool: Fastball
2018 location: Triple-A Oklahoma City
ETA: 2019

60. SS Albert Suarez (6’4, 144 pounds, 18 years old)

The Dodgers signed Suarez for $300,000 out of the Dominican Republic in July 2016. He was their first “big” signing after their 2015-16 spending spree. His first go through the DSL had some successes, but he’ll definitely need to improve at the plate to be anything more than a utility player going forward. Luckily for him, he’s a solid defender at shortstop with some high baseball IQ. He should make it to the AZL this year at some point. He was No. 91 last year.

Best tool: Defense
2018 location: DSL Dodgers/AZL Dodgers
ETA: 2024

59. LHP Robinson Ortiz (6’0, 186 pounds, 18 years old)

Ortiz was signed out of the Dominican Republic as a 17-year-old for an undisclosed bonus. He had a fine showing in the DSL (3.13 ERA, 23.2 K%, 3.3 BB%), but his showing in the instructional league is what has some folks excited. He sits in the 90-93 MPH with natural arm-side run. He backs it up with a sharp breaking ball that looks like it could induce some swings and misses. He’s stout and built a little like Julio Urias was when he burst onto the scene a few years ago. He’ll be an interesting prospect to follow in the coming years.

Best tool: Fastball
2018 location: AZL Dodgers/Rookie Ogden
ETA: 2023

58. 3B/1B Jared Walker (6’0, 203 pounds, 22 years old)

Walker, a 2014 5th-rounder, was No. 66 on this list last year and showed a little improvement. The left-handed hitter had a nice power spike in the Midwest League (.313 ISO), but he struggled a bit in the California League (.653 OPS), which was a bit surprising. If his power continues to develop, he could be a more interesting prospect than he is right now. Defensively, he’s probably a corner infielder, but he did dabble a bit at second base last season in hopes of increasing his utility.

Best tool: Power
2018 location: High-A Rancho Cucamonga
ETA: 2021

57. OF/1B Luke Raley (6’3, 222 pounds, 23 years old)

Raley was the Dodgers’ 7th-rounder out of Lake Erie College in 2016. He signed for a below-slot $150,000. He had a strong 2017 season that put him on the prospect. In the hitter-friendly California League, he hit .295/.375/.475 with 14 home runs, 21 doubles and 11 triples. He played mostly in the outfield, but he has some experience at first base as well. Double-A will be a big test for him. If he passes it, look for him to jump up this list next season. He has a chance to be 2018’s Matt Beaty.

Best tool: Hit
2018 location: Double-A Tulsa
ETA: 2020

56. RHP Jesen Therrien (6’2, 200 pounds, 25 years old)

Therrien was the Phillies’ 17th-rounder in 2011 out of Canada. After spending five seasons in the minors, he made his MLB debut in 2017. Unfortunately, he got roughed up a bit (8.35 ERA, -0.3 fWAR) and ultimately needed Tommy John surgery in late September. The Dodgers signed him to a 2-year minor-league deal knowing he’d miss the 2018 season. In the minors, he posted some solid K-BB% (13.8) numbers and showed good enough stuff (93-95 MPH fastball, mid-80s wipeout slider) to be a solid relief prospect. He’s a guy to watch come the 2019 season, assuming he recovers from TJ well enough.

Best tool: Slider
2018 location: Camelback Ranch
ETA: Debuted 2017

55. RHP Adam Bray (6’1, 221 pounds, 25 years old)

Bray was a 33rd-round pick out of baseball powerhouse South Dakota State in 2015. He’s done nothing but produce decent numbers in his brief career. In the hitters’ haven that is the California League, Bray posted a 3.89 ERA and struck out 22 percent of the hitters he faced. He walked just 4.8 percent. That’s even more impressive when you consider he doesn’t have premium stuff (fringy fastball, curveball, changeup). He succeeds by locating his pitches where he wants on a consistent basis. He has swingman/long reliever upside.

Best tool: Command/Control
2018 location: Double-A Tulsa
ETA: 2020

54. CF Saige Jenco (5’9, 177 pounds, 23 years old)

The speedy Jenco was drafted in the 24th round out of Virginia Tech in 2016. He hasn’t made it beyond Low-A just yet, but he has shown some flashes in his career. He’s not a power hitter by any means, so he’ll rely on his bat-to-ball and on-base skills to be a pesky offensive performer. His best tool is his speed, as he’s 34-for-43 on stolen base attempts in his career. He’s a legitimate center fielder, which brightens his prospect status a bit more than if he were a corner guy. He checked in at No. 81 last year.

Best tool: Speed
2018 location: High-A Rancho Cucamonga
ETA: 2021

53. OF Donovan Casey (6’2, 197 pounds, 22 years old)

Casey was the Dodgers’ 20th-round selection in 2017 out of Boston College. He was a bit of a surprise signing, but he did and posted some incredible numbers in his debut: .403/.453/.604. Don’t get too excited, as he was a college draftee playing in Rookie ball, so domination isn’t exactly unexpected. But Casey’s scouting profile is interesting. He’s one of the more athletic prospects in the org and was even looked at as a pitcher by some in the most recent draft. He may never fully develop as a power hitter, but he has the tools to be a 4th-outfielder type, especially if he can handle center field. How he does in full-season ball will determine his prospect status going forward.

Best tool: Speed
2018 location: Low-A Great Lakes
ETA: 2021

52. 3B Jefrey Souffront (6’0, 210 pounds, 21 years old)

The Dodgers signed Souffront for $60,000 out of the Dominican back in July 2015. He repeated the AZL in 2017, but he did so by posting better offensive numbers than he did in the previous season. It may have been more for defensive purposes, as he settled into third base nicely after bouncing between first, second, third and shortstop in his first two pro seasons. With the bat, Souffront showed some good bat-to-ball ability and some pop. He should probably just skip Ogden and go get tested in the Midwest League as a 21-year-old. If he hits well there, he could not only get promoted midseason, but would shoot up this prospect list. He was 61st last year.

Best tool: Power
2018 location: Low-A Great Lakes
ETA: 2022

51. 3B/1B Miguel Vargas (6’3, 190 pounds, 18 years old)

Vargas was an unheralded signing out of Cuba back in September. He signed for $300,000, but that isn’t surprising. What is surprising is Vargas has been on the market for awhile. He defected from Cuba as a 16-year-old back in November 2015. It took him almost two years find a home with a Major League organization. His father played 22 years in Serie Nacional — Cuba’s highest professional league. The junior Vargas’ only experience in Serie Nacional is back in 2014-15 (as a 15 or 16-year-old) when he appeared in eight games and went 3-for-26 with a double. He projects to be a bat-first player who might be able to stick at third base.

Best tool: Power
2018 location: DSL Dodgers/AZL Dodgers
ETA: 2024

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Next Up: Prospects 50-41

About Dustin Nosler

Dustin Nosler
Dustin Nosler began writing about the Dodgers in July 2009 at his blog, Feelin' Kinda Blue. He co-hosts a weekly podcast with Jared Massey called Dugout Blues. He is a contributor/editor at The Hardball Times. He graduated from California State University, Sacramento, with his bachelor’s degree in journalism and a minor in digital media. While at CSUS, he worked for the student-run newspaper The State Hornet for three years, culminating with a 1-year term as editor-in-chief. He resides in Stockton, Calif.